Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Update on Toy Sewing Machines

I have more information on the Toy Sewing Machines that I posted about yesterday

I have two great reference books on Toy and Miniature Sewing Machines.  These were written by Glenda Thomas.  I found the 2nd book at an Antique store, a few years ago, and ordered the first book a year so so ago.  Both are great books!




By looking at the great pictures in the books, I found that Debbie's Singer 20 is from around 1914.  You can tell by the handwheel.
middle handwheel is from around 1914 (from the book)
Here is a picture of Debbie's hand wheel.
Debbie's handwheel
It is also easy to tell from this picture, and description:
from the book

from the book
Here is another picture of Debbie's machine.  Check out the tension, in comparison to the picture above.
Debbie's matches the tension from the 1914 machine in the book


I also found information on the toy machine that Carrie gave me.  It is a Casige, made in Germany.
Casige emblem, from the book

picture of the same decal set, from the book

description of same machine, from the book
Here is a picture of my machine, showing the same decal set at the picture above.
front of my machine

back of my machine

This means that my machine is from the 1930's. Casige made Toy machines from 1902 to 1975.  Can you believe that a machine like mine, sold for only 98 cents in 1934? 

The sewing plate on my machine has an imprint stamped on it.  I couldn't get a picture of mine, but, the book had a great picture, and the imprint is the same.
imprint on the sewing plate

I love being able to find information about the machines that I collect.  I wouldn't have been able to find all this info, if it hadn't been for both of these books.  Thank you Glenda Thomas, for all the hard work you did, in writing these books.  What a treasure trove of information.  I highly recommend both of these books.  I've been able to find information on almost every toy machine I have, no matter how tiny.  

I had a few queries about the rust erasers that I use.  My contact has just found them again (they were unavailable for a while), and she is checking on her prices.  One person who asked is a no-reply blogger, thus, I can't send her the info.  If you are no-reply PLEASE include your email address, so that I can respond to you. 







9 comments:

  1. I would love to know about the rust erasers. They would be great for the machines people bring me to polish up.

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  2. Your blogs are always so interesting. 98 cents! WOW. I wonder how many grown ups bought them to use themselves.
    Hugs

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  3. How nice to have the reference materials. Thinking about 98 cents though that was a lot of money back then.

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  4. What great resources for you to really date these machines. They are just special pieces of history.

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  5. Be sure and check out my blog post today. There was a whole room full of toy sewing machines at the Virginia Quilt Museum. http://catpatches.blogspot.com/2017/11/a-quilty-day.html

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  6. Very interesting machines. About what size is your Casige 98 cent machine? I too would be interested in this rust eraser. Is it something I could get rust off a bobbin case by the little tension screw?

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  7. I just read Barbara's post about the toy machines, I need to get info from my friend and photos for you to look at. SHe is not letting it go, I am just interested!

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  8. I had a toy machine when I was young, but it wasn't an antique, and it never worked very well. I used my mom's treadle instead.

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  9. Very interesting about the toy machines reference books. You are really smart in getting these. I have a couple toy machines that I should take pictures of and look into what they are! Guess you are nudging me to get to it! :)

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